#TwitterPitch

There’s this thing called TwitterPitch that I think I’m going to do. Heard of it? You probably haven’t as I just heard of it and I’ve been in the writing game for a few years. Although, I’m slightly retarded when it comes to being up to date on things so maybe you have. But if not, it’s this great tool for authors to submit their MS via twitter with an (obviously short) pitch. I don’t really use twitter. I’m still unsure about the whole thing and why I should be on there and why I should care (I’m being totally honest here. I just don’t think it’s my thing.) BUT I like that this is a new platform for reaching out to agents and publishers and people, so I’m going to give it a go. At least, for the TwitterPitch.

Ready?

Let’s pretend you are this *amazing* agent who’s like, ‘yeah, I represent baddass authors. All my bitches be at the top of the Best Sellers list (I don’t know why you talk like this. You should probably sound more professional.) So, you’re having a look through the Twittersphere to find your next favorite project. Then you come across the following:

After what happened three years ago, Autumn Sommers knows to avoid Alex Wolf. Now that a school assignment has brought them together, she’ll be forced to move beyond their past with the one person who can’t seem to forget it. But neither expects what happens next. #YA#R#IWSGPIT

Eh? Eh?

What do you think? Would that make you want to ask for more? A first chapter perhaps? If you’re wondering about the #YA#R#IWSGPIT, it’s the age, genre, and group I’m submitting through. Young Adult in the Romance category through the IWSG. The deal is, you ‘pitch’ your book through Twitter and if an agent or publisher is interested, they’ll request (along with a query and/or synopsis) a chapter or a partial or full MS. How cool is that? Sometimes living in this age rocks.  😊

I’m working on my query and synopsis in case anyone bites. I’m still totally planning on self-publishing because at least I know it’ll get out into the world, but why not try traditional as well? What could it hurt? It’s another shot and that’s what I need to be doing—taking as many shots as possible (basketball metaphor. Not alcohol. Although…)

Batman is so encouraging of me. He shows me videos all the time of people—famous, amazing people—who started off being told no. Or being turned down. Or thinking they weren’t good enough. There are so many I love and think about often, but for today’s post, I’ll reference the Will Ferrell one. Batman showed me a clip of Will Ferrell talking about his early days, before getting on SNL, before becoming the name he is and that his plan—his entire plan—was to keep throwing darts at the board because he knew ONE of them would eventually stick. So that’s what I’m doing. Throwing darts. Taking shots (basketball, people!) because I know ONE of them will work. It has to, right?

I’d love your feedback on the pitch. And for any authors interested, it’s happening on January 18th. Check out the info page at IWSG here. 😊

9 thoughts on “#TwitterPitch

  1. H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw says:

    First off good luck. A lot of agents are on Twitter. If you look up hashtags like #querytip, you’ll see actually agent advice. I think your pitch is too long, more that 280 characters. Take a look at past entries for #IWSGPIT and #Pitmad and see what got hearts.I think that will help you see what grabs agents.

    Like

  2. Joleene Naylor says:

    I think you can leave their last names out to shorten… also…

    Autumn has avoided Alex for three years, but a school project has brought them together. Can they overcome a dark/whatever-word-fits-here past?

    Just a thought 😉

    Like

  3. Loni Townsend says:

    I think it’s a bit long too, but Joleene’s suggestion is good.

    I have a local friend who has been playing the Twitter pitch game for a while now. It’s fun to see the different angles she comes up with. I’d suggest getting four or five different pitches compiled, and then circulate through them during the Twitter pitch and compare which gets you the most attention.

    Like

    • Loni Townsend says:

      Joleene’s pitch got me thinking of other ways you could shorten it and make it punchy. This is fodder for the thought machine:
      Autumn successfully avoided Alex for three years, but a school assignment thrusts them together again. She wants to bury their past, but he seems to be stuck in it.

      Like

  4. Mason T. Matchak says:

    I’ve done quite a few twitter pitches, though the upcoming IWSG one will be my first with 280 characters. I’m kind of excited at getting to say more. ^_^ One bit of advice for yours: be as specific as you can. Saying “what happened three years ago” is vague and I don’t think it’ll draw attention. I’ve see agents talk about how important it is to be specific in queries, as they want to know what happens, not get a vague sense of it. Good luck!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s